How This Ancient Martial Art Helps Japanese Police Fight Crime


(drum line hype music) (drum line hype music) (soft music) (soft music) (screaming) (screaming) (beating drums, snare) (dramatic background music)

19 thoughts on “How This Ancient Martial Art Helps Japanese Police Fight Crime

  1. Ok a somewhat kendo expert here to clarify some things.
    First, people need to stop to think that officers actually go on patrol with shinais or that they use their Jo (the wooden staff) and baton as shinais and fight kendo against criminals. 
    For a normal police officer, Kendo should help to control emotions, build mental and spiritual strength. It is true that police officers can choose either judo or kendo as part of their training, the reality is that most of them chose judo and only a few do kendo. and only twice a week for a few hours, as they also have other kinds of physical education.
    Hamasaki sensei in the video was part of the "tokuren" in the Tokyo met police – a special unit of the police, which specialises in sports, particularly in judo and kendo. These police officers are part of the riot police and do kendo at least 6 times a week and three times a day – at least for the bigger prefectural police forces such as Tokyo met police, Kanagawa, Osaka, Hokkaido and kumamoto. They do police work in the riot police once in a while but are more kendoka than policemen. Their kendo is highly competitive rather than mental and spiritual and hence more tough. In fact, nearly every all Japan kendo champion was a police officer, and out of 64 competitors, at least 50 are police officers. Their kendo is highly competitive rather than mental and spiritual. In fact, nearly every all Japan kendo champion was a police officer, and out of 64 competitors, at least 50 are police officers.
    What I want to say is that this video does not accurately reflect the Japanese police training of kendo, as normal officers and tokuren officers are not the same.
    If you have questions regarding police kendo do not hesitate to ask.

  2. But Kendo is made because Samurai was disbanded and kenjutsu and real swords were banned for a while…how is it dated back to 2000 years ago? It is just around 150 years ago.
    Learn history before writing something.

  3. I actually tried it for about 6 months. Doesn't look that hard with this video but you have to train barefeet all the time sliding on your feets to make a movement and it took away all my right underfoot skin…
    I could barely walk for 2 weeks. Much respect to all of these guys who train for years and achieve a high level.

  4. I do kendo but we dont use it outdoors,because kendo is a sport,in the old centurys they use it to practice with katanas,now it became a sport

  5. Guy: pulls out knife
    American cops: fires all the rounds in his mag
    Other guy: * pulls out knife*
    Japanese police: uses a pole to take down the suspect
    I'm guessing japanese police are not allowed to use guns in situations like that.

  6. Great for forearm strength and could possibly improve your grip strength, your mental abilities, and your pain tolerance. Maybe mma or other combat sports that require forearm strength and speed.

Leave comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *.